10+ Deadly Devils of the Ocean

10+ Deadly Devils of the Ocean

Ocean and sea covers three fourth area of this whole earth so it is very natural that there resides more creature than on non watery area. We can count creatures on earth but it is impossible to count creatures in water.

We know many creatures of water but still many of them are undiscovered. Some of the ocean creatures look very beautiful and some look very dangerous and horrible. Although some of them are beautiful but still you cannot predict about what that creature can do.

At the same all animals which are found in ocean are not necessarily dangerous. Generally they do it for their food and many a times they are dangerous and harm us in order to get protected. These animals vary in many forms from size and shape to their weight and method of preying.

They weight from a ball to tons. It is possible to get escape from some of these creatures but some will not leave you at any cost and the day of meeting them could be the last day of your life. Although these animals get hunted by man are getting lesser in number. These creatures are given the talent of hunting as a god gift. I hope you will like this article. So if you do like then please comment. We are waiting.

Great barracuda

Great barracuda
Great barracuda

The great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) also known as the giant barracuda is a species of barracuda. Great barracudas often grow over 6 feet (1.8 m) long and are a type of ray-finned fish.

The great barracuda is the biggest of all the barracuda species and is built like a torpedo. A solo hunter, it hunts in the shallows and around coral reefs, and has incredible vision with which it can either ambush or chase prey down. Officially, only two humans have been killed by barracudas, but they are suspected in many other deaths.

Sperm Whale

Sperm Whale
Sperm Whale

The sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus, is a marine mammal species, order Cetacea, a toothed whale (odontocete) having the largest brain of any animal. The name comes from the milky-white waxy substance, spermaceti, found in the animal’s head.

The sperm whale is the only living member of genus Physeter. The now outdated synonym Physeter catodon refers to the same species. It is one of three extant species in the sperm whale superfamily, along with the pygmy sperm whale and dwarf sperm whale.

A mature male can grow to 20.5 metres (67 ft) long. It is the largest living toothed animal. For large males, the head can represent up to one-third of the animal’s length. It has a cosmopolitan distribution across the oceans. The species feeds primarily on squid but to some extent on fish, diving as deep as 3 kilometres (9,800 ft), which makes it the deepest diving mammal. Its diet includes giant squid and colossal squid.

The sperm whale’s clicking vocalization is the loudest sound produced by any animal. The clicking is used for sonar and may also be used for other purposes.These whales live in groups called social units. Units of females and their young live separately from sexually mature males. The females cooperate to protect and nurse their young. Females give birth every three to six years, and care for the calves for more than a decade. The sperm whale has few natural predators, since few are strong enough to successfully attack a healthy adult; orcas attack units and are capable of killing the calves. The sperm whale can live for more than 70 years.

Bull Shark

Bull Shark
Bull Shark

The bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas, also known as Zambezi shark or unofficially known as Zambi in Africa and Nicaragua shark in Nicaragua, is a shark common worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. The bull shark is well known for its unpredictable, often aggressive behavior.

The bull shark can thrive in both saltwater and freshwater and can travel far up rivers. They have even been known to travel as far up as Indiana in the Ohio River and Red Wing Minnesota in the Mississippi River, although there have been few recorded attacks. They are probably responsible for the majority of near-shore shark attacks, including many attacks attributed to other species.[2] However, bull sharks are not true freshwater sharks (unlike the river sharks of the genus Glyphis).

Electric ray

Electric ray
Electric ray

The electric rays are a group of rays, flattened cartilaginous fish with enlarged pectoral fins, comprising the order Torpediniformes. They are known for being capable of producing an electric discharge, ranging from as little as 8 volts up to 220 volts depending on species, used to stun prey and for defense.There are 69 species in four families.

Perhaps the best known members are those of the genus Torpedo, also called crampfish and numbfish, after which the device called a torpedo is named. The name comes from the Latin torpere, to be stiffened or paralyzed, referring to the effect on someone who handles or steps on a living electric ray.

With their thick, flabby bodies and short tails, torpedo rays are poor swimmers. Their disk-shaped bodies allow them to remain suspended in the water or roam with minimal swimming effort.

Billfish

Billfish
Billfish

The term billfish is applied to a number of different large, predatory fish characterised by their large size (swordfish can be over 4 metres long) and their long, sword-like bill. Billfish include the sailfish and marlin, which make up the family Istiophoridae, and the swordfish, sole member of the family Xiphiidae.

They are important apex predators feeding on a wide variety of smaller fish and cephalopods. While billfish are most common in tropical and subtropical waters, swordfish in particular are sometimes found in temperate waters as well. Billfish are characterized by a long spearlike or swordlike upper jaw or beak that may be used to stun prey during feeding; although this bill has been employed in apparent aggression to spear objects, including boats, it is not deliberately used to spear prey. These species are pelagic, migratory, and found in all oceans.

Leopard seal

Leopard seal
Leopard seal

The leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), also referred to as the sea leopard, is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after the southern elephant seal). It is most common in the southern hemisphere along the coast of Antarctica and on most sub-Antarctic islands, but can also be found on the coasts of southern Australia, Tasmania, South Africa, New Zealand, Lord Howe Island, Tierra del Fuego, the Cook Islands, and the Atlantic coast of South America. It can live twenty-six years, possibly more.Orcas and large sharks are the only natural predators of leopard seals.

Along with all of the other earless seals, it belongs to the family Phocidae, and is the only species in the genus Hydrurga. The name hydrurga means “water worker” and leptonyx is the Greek for “small clawed”.

Olive Sea Snake

Olive Sea Snake
Olive Sea Snake

Sharp teeth, speed and surprise are not the only tools for hunting in the ocean; venom can also kill, and among the most venomous animals on earth is the olive sea snake. It is the most toxic snake in the ocean, with one bite said to be able to deliver enough venom to kill 20 full-grown men. The small hollow fangs contain two different toxins: a neurotoxin that affects the nerves and a myelotoxic affecting the tissue, which combined can cause a swift death. The olive sea snake has a good sense of smell and also has a hidden extra weapon to call on. In its tail there are light-sensitive nerve cells that pick up the reflections of fish, giving it another set of “eyes”. Danger for scuba divers occurs when the snake goes up to the surface to breathe and back down again, crossing paths with the divers.

Fire Sea Urchin

Fire Sea Urchin
Fire Sea Urchin

The fire sea urchin not only has venom; it can also bite. The size of a baseball or smaller, it is still one of the deadliest creatures in the ocean. It injects its venom in two ways: its spines contain venom sacs, with the venom able to be injected directly into the wound through the spine; but it also has dozens of tiny jaws that snap shut on prey and inject the paralyzing toxin into its victim. These attractive but deadly urchins have killed humans before, and there is no antivenom.

Box jellyfish

Box jellyfish
Box jellyfish

The biggest known venomous killer of humans in the sea is the box jellyfish. It has killed upwards of 80 people in Australia alone in the past 50 years and is the most toxic jellyfish there is. The box jellyfish also actively hunts rather than just drifting along until prey appears, unlike true jellyfish. Another notable feature of the box jellyfish is its sets of eyes, which function very like human eyes. They can have around 60 tentacles with thousands of stinging cells with which to inject their venom into their prey, and that can cause complete cardiac and respiratory arrest in humans.

Killer Whales

Killer Whales
Killer Whales

The killer whale (Orcinus orca), commonly referred to as the orca whale or orca, and less commonly as the blackfish, is a toothed whale belonging to the oceanic dolphin family. Killer whales are found in all oceans, from the frigid Arctic and Antarctic regions to tropical seas.

Killer whales as a species have a diverse diet, although individual populations often specialize in particular types of prey. Some feed exclusively on fish, while others hunt marine mammals such as sea lions, seals, walruses and even large whales. Killer whales are regarded as apex predators, lacking natural predators.

Killer whales are highly social; some populations are composed of matrilineal family groups which are the most stable of any animal species.Their sophisticated hunting techniques and vocal behaviors, which are often specific to a particular group and passed across generations, have been described as manifestations of culture.

Great white shark

Great white shark
Great white shark

The great white shark, scientific name Carcharodon carcharias, also known as the great white, white pointer, white shark, or white death, is a large lamniform shark found in coastal surface waters in all major oceans. It is known for its size, with the largest individuals known to have approached or exceeded 6 metres (20 ft) in length,and 2,268 kilograms (5,000 lb) in weight.This shark reaches maturity at around 15 years of age and can have a life span of over 30 years.

The great white shark is arguably the world’s largest known extant macropredatory fish and is one of the primary predators of marine mammals. It is also known to prey upon a variety of other marine animals including fish, pinnipeds, and seabirds. It is the only known surviving species of its genus, Carcharodon, and is ranked first in a list of number of recorded attacks on humans.

Salt Water Crocodile

Salt Water Crocodile
Salt Water Crocodile

The saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), also known as the estuarine or Indo-Pacific crocodile, is the largest of all living reptiles. It is found in suitable habitats from Northern Australia through Southeast Asia to the eastern coast of India. Another massive animal, it is the largest reptile on earth and has existed unchanged for 60 million years.

A confirmed man-eater, it is 900 kg of pure muscle. Glands on its tongue allow it to expel the salt of the ocean although actually it rarely lives in the ocean, preferring rivers, swamps and tributaries. When it hunts its quarry, it explodes on them, twisting and rolling to kill, and uses its 60 or so sharp teeth to shred flesh and break through bone.

Almost all of the hunters listed here have attacked at least one person or have a human fatality to their name, and all are the deadliest ocean hunters to their prey. Whether they hunt alone, in teams, or wait for prey to come to them, the end is the same: a swift and merciless death.

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