Miniature Photography : Insects And Fly Under The Microscope

Miniature Photography : Insects And Fly Under The Microscope

It may appear creepy to some but i find it beautiful and fascinating. Insects and fly are common creatures in human life, some of these can heal us medicinally or others can be irritating. But after seeing the marvelous photography done using microscope technology these little things look quite awesome to me. I hope you like them as well and let us know which one creeps you out. 

A coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the head of a maggot or the larva of a bluebottle fly (Protophormia sp.) with tiny teeth-like fangs extending from its mouth. The maggots of this fly are used medicinally to clean wounds. The maggots are sterilised and placed in the wound, where they feed on dead tissue and leave healthy tissue untouched.

Their saliva contains anti- bacterial chemicals which maintain sterility in the area. Maggots are used on ulcers and deep wounds away from organs or body cavities, most often being used to treat diabetic ulcers on the feet

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of a cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) amongst cat hairs

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of a common housefly (Musca domestica). The head is dominated by a pair of large compound eyes, each eye composed of about 4000 image-forming facets called ommatidia. Mouthparts are visible between and beneath the eyes. Hairs on the head and body act as tactile organs. Houseflies tend to feed on decomposing matter as well as human food, and they may pick up and transmit serious diseases to humans

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of a house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus). Millions of dust mites inhabit the home, feeding on shed skin cells. They mainly live in furniture, and are usually harmless. However, their excrement and dead bodies may cause allergic reactions in susceptible people

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of a meal (or flour) mite (Acarus siro). It has long hairs extending from its body and large powerful front legs. This species is a common pest of granaries, mills and kitchens, feeding particularly on grains and cereals

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a Silverfish (Lepisma saccharina). This primitive insect has remained unchanged for millions of years, and is considered a living fossil. The head is covered in sensory hairs. Its mouth parts are across the bottom. The compound eyes (green) are either side of the head, and two antennae protrude from its head at far left and right. The silverfish, so named because it is covered in tiny shiny scales, is a common household pest

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum). Red flour beetles are an agricultural pest that attack stored grain products such as flour, seeds, cereals, pasta, biscuits, beans, nuts etc, causing loss and damage. This specimen was found inside a Barbados nut (Jatropha curcas) seed pod

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of a daddy-long-legs spider (Pholcus phalangioides). Its eight eyes (yellow) are seen at centre. This spider preys on other spiders, injecting them with venom from its fangs (bottom centre). Although native to the tropics it is now a common site in houses worldwide. The daddy-long-legs spider is so called because its legs are around 5 to 6 times the length of its body. This spider should not be confused with the harvestman, a relative of the spiders in the order Opiliones, or the crane fly (family Tipulidae), which are also known as daddy-long-legs

Some of the shocking images were captured by Brit Steve Gschmeissner, 61, a retired scientific photographer from Bedford. A coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a human flea (Pulex irritans)

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a yellow dung fly (Scatophaga stercoraria)

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a Jumping Spider (family Salticidae)

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of a fly

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a tropical caterpillar (order Lepidoptera)

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of the underside of the head of a froghopper (superfamily Cercopoidea)

Coloured scanning electron micrograph of a dog flea (Ctenocephalides canis)

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of a common wasp (Vespula vulgaris) head

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of a wasp’s head (order Hymenoptera)

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a soldier turtle ant (Cephalotes sp.) from the Amazonian rainforest

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a honey bee (Apis sp.)

A coloured scanning electron micrograph of the head of a bedbug (Cimex sp.)

Source : Telegraph, Photo Source : Getty Images & Reuters

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