Ricinus communism

Poisonous Plant – No Touching,Only See!!!

Plants are essential for any ecosystem.There are a lot of living things that have been classified as poisonous and violent and you would like to keep on numerous feet left from these living beings when you come across to them.

Can you ever imagined having same creepy feeling when thinking about plants? Yes, there be present numerous plants who are poisonous as much as necessary to turn into a dreadful. I have collected some poisonous plant in this post. Have a look…

Ricinus communism

Ricinus communism
Ricinus communism

The castor oil plant, Ricinus communis, is a species of flowering plant in the spurge family, Euphorbiaceae. It belongs to a monotypic genus, Ricinus, and subtribe, Ricininae. The evolution of castor and its relation to other species are currently being studied.

Its seed is the castor bean which, despite its name, is not a true bean. Castor is indigenous to the southeastern Mediterranean Basin, Eastern Africa, and India, but is widespread throughout tropical regions (and widely grown elsewhere as an ornamental plant).

The castor oil plant can vary greatly in its growth habit and appearance. The variability has been increased by breeders who have selected a range of cultivars for leaf and flower colors, and for oil production. It is a fast-growing, suckering perennial shrub which can reach the size of a small tree (around 12 metres / 39 feet), but it is not cold hardy.

Cnidoscolus stimulosus

Cnidoscolus stimulosus
Cnidoscolus stimulosus

Spurge nettle (Cnidoscolus stimulosus), also known as bull nettle, Tread-softly and Finger Rot, is a perennial herb covered with stinging hairs, native to southeastern North America. A member of the family Euphorbiaceae (spurge family), it is not a true nettle. It prefers sandy, well-drained soil and mostly exists in pine/blackjack oak forests on sandhills, rims of Carolina bays, dunes, dry pastures, fields and roadsides.

The green leaves of this plant are alternate, consisting of three to five untoothed lobes. The large, white flowers have five petals. Male and female flowers are on different plants. Flowers occur throughout the spring and summer followed by a small capsule that produces three large seeds. The entire plant above ground including the flower petals are covered with stinging hairs. The tap root can be used as an excellent potato substitute, tasting like pasta.

As the common names imply, the urticating hairs on this plant contain a caustic irritant that inflicts a painful sting to those who contact it with bare skin. It can cause a painful, irritating rash and can cause more serious reactions with some people.

Angel Trumpet

Angel Trumpet
Angel Trumpet

Brugmansia is a genus of seven species of flowering plants in the family Solanaceae native to tropical South America. Their large, fragrant flowers give them their common name of Angel’s Trumpets, a name sometimes used for the closely related genus Datura.

Brugmansia are large shrubs or small trees, with semi-woody, often many-branched trunks. They can reach heights of 3–11 m (10–36 ft).

The leaves are alternately arranged along the stems, generally large, 10–30 cm (4–12 in) long and 4–18 cm (2–7 in) across, with an entire or coarsely toothed margin, and are often covered with fine hairs.

The name Angel’s Trumpet refers to the large, pendulous, trumpet-shaped flowers, 14–50 cm (6–20 in) long and 10–35 cm (4–14 in) across at the opening. They come in shades of white, yellow, pink, orange, green, or red. Most have a strong, pleasing fragrance that is most noticeable in the evening. Flowers may be single, double, or more.

Brugmansia are woody trees or bushes, with pendulous, not erect, flowers, that have no spines on their fruit. Datura species are herbaceous bushes with erect (not pendulous) flowers, and most have spines on their fruit.

White Snakeroot

White Snakeroot
White Snakeroot

White Snakeroot (Ageratina altissima), also known as White Sanicle or Tall Boneset, is a poisonous perennial herb in the family Asteraceae, native to eastern North America. An older binomial name for this species was Eupatorium rugosum, but the genus Eupatorium has undergone taxonomic revision by botanists and a number of the species once included there have been moved to other genera.

Plants are upright or sometimes ascending, growing to 1.5 meters tall, producing single or multi-stemmed clumps. They are found in woods and brush thickets where they bloom mid to late summer or fall. The flowers are a clean white color and after blooming, small seeds with fluffy white tails are released to blow in the wind.

This species is adaptive to different growing conditions and can be found in open shady areas with open bare ground; it can be weedy in shady landscapes and in hedgerows. There are two different varieties Ageratina altissima var. angustata and Ageratina altissima var. roanensis (Appalachian white snakeroot); they differ in the length of the flower phyllaries and shape of the apices.

Common Bladderwort

Common Bladderwort
Common Bladderwort

Utricularia macrorhiza, the common bladderwort,is a large, perennial suspended aquatic carnivorous plant that belongs to the genus Utricularia. U. macrorhiza is native to North America and eastern temperate Asia.

Common Bladderwort has lacy leaves, quarter to two inches-long; subdivided into segments of unequal length, having thread-like segments. Carnivorous bladders are attached at regular intervals along the linear leaf segments that trap and digest tiny water invertebrates. Its Bladders are small, dispirited, pear-shaped pouches.

They open suddenly when trigger hairs are disturbed, sucking in water and any unfortunate water creature responsible for setting off the trap. Digestive enzymes and bacteria found in the bladder digest the victim for the nutritional use of the plant; a process takes 15 minutes to 2 hours, for complete digestion. Its special cells extract the nutrient-rich water from the bladder into the stem, thus reinstating the vacuum and resetting the trap for its next victim.

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