Some Really Endangered Species…

What will be the world after 25 or 35 years? I don’t have any economic or political or even an engineering answer but let me guarantee one thing that the world will surely miss millions of animal species after some time.

Your kids will ask silly questions regarding an animal, they are being taught in school class. Let it be a Leather-back Turtle, or Siberian Tiger or any else species, they won’t be on this earth anymore.

The global warming, deforestation, etc. are the main culprits and so humans are. So please at least try at your level to save them. In this post we have collected some really endangered species. Have a look!

Iberian Lynx

Iberian Lynx
Iberian Lynx

The Iberian Lynx is the most endangered species of cats, and given very few, if any cat species have gone extinct in the past 2,000 years, something must really be going wrong. Right now, there are fewer than 100 in the world, all of which are in Andalucia, the southernmost region of Spain.

A combination of increased construction in their habitats, vehicle collisions, poaching for fur and a starkly diminished population of rabbits have resulted in the incredibly low number of lynx in the wild. Additionally, during the second months of an infant lynx’s lifespan, siblings from the same litter will become incredibly violent towards one another, often killing the weaker cub.

Red Wolf

Red Wolf
Red Wolf

About 30 years ago, the last 17 remaining red wolves were put into captivity in an attempt to re-stabilize their population in the wilderness of the southeastern United States. Decades later, their numbers have increased to about 100–but deforestation in the area is simultaneously reaching record levels, poising to again push the red wolf population into extinction.

Dama Gazelle

Dama Gazelle
Dama Gazelle

Indigenous to central-north African countries like Niger, Chad, and Mali, the Dama Gazelle has received little support from conservation groups and has fallen well below even 100 gazelles found at a time. They were once fast and numerous, but an onslaught of readily-available automatic weapons has proven a fatal blow to their numbers. Despite their probably extinction, the Dama Gazelle is a national symbol in Niger, where it appears on the emblem of the Niger national football team.

Leatherback Turtle

Leatherback Turtle
Leatherback Turtle

Outside of crocodiles, leatherback turtles are the world’s largest reptile. They’ve been recorded growing up to 10 feet long and more than 2,000 pounds. Due to their diet of jellyfish, they routinely dive distances over thousands of meters below the sea–making them the world’s deepest-diving non-sea-creature. But as well, they often mistake pieces of plastic debris for jellyfish and die from choking or ingesting harmful material.

At one point a few decades ago, leatherbacks thrived with a population of more than 115,000 females nesting each year. Today, that number is now somewhere between 26,000 to 43,000–a dramatic drop that’s put it on the critically endangered species list.

Black Rhinoceros

Black Rhinoceros
Black Rhinoceros

The black rhino was once the most populous, thriving species of rhino on the planet with several hundred thousand living throughout Africa. Today, their numbers have dwindled immensely, and the Western species of black rhino has been declared extinct.

The biggest threat to rhinos has typically been the poaching of their horns to make opulent ceremonial daggers called jambiyas, as well as usage in traditional Chinese medicine (which also has driven the Javanese rhino into near-extinction). If you’re reading this and feel far from the scene of the problem, consider this: in June 2007, a black rhino horn was confiscated at a traditional Chinese medicine store in Portland, Oregon.

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