Apr 17, 2014

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10 Weirdest Dog Species all around the Earth

The domestic dog is a subspecies of the gray wolf, a member of the Canidae family of the mammalian order “Carnivore”. The term “domestic dog” is generally used for both domesticated and feral varieties.

The dog may have been the first animal to be domesticated, and has been the most widely kept working, hunting, and companion animal in human history. The word “dog” may also mean the male of a canine species, as opposed to the word “bitch” for the female of the species.

Dogs perform many roles for people, such as hunting, herding, pulling loads, protection, assisting police and military, companionship, and, more recently, aiding handicapped individuals.

Well these dogs may be honest and friendly their looks are something to contend with. These dogs are ones that you are not likely to see every day but if you do, you will not soon forget them when you do. If you want an exceptional pet that is as faithful and friendly and a dog, then one of these dogs may be just what you are looking for. The dog is the god of frolic.

Here is the List has 10 weirdest dog all over the earth.

Chinese Crested

Chinese Crested

Chinese Crested

The Chinese crested dog is a smaller (10–13 lbs) hairless breed of dog. Like most hairless dog breeds, the Chinese crested comes in two varieties, both with and without fur, which are born in the same litter: the Hairless and the Powderpuff.

At first look, the “Hairless”, and “Powderpuff” varieties of Chinese crested Dogs appear to be two different breeds, but hairlessness is an incomplete dominant trait within a single breed. The Hairless has soft, humanlike skin, as well as tufts of fur on its paws (“socks”) and tail (“plume”) and long, flowing hair on its head (“crest”). In addition to being an incomplete dominant gene, the “hairless” gene has a prenatal lethal effect when homozygous. Zygotes affected with double hairless genes (1 in 4) never develop into puppies, and are reabsorbed in the womb. All hairless Cresteds are therefore heterozygous.

The Hairless variety can vary in amount of body hair. Fur on the muzzle, known as a beard, is not uncommon. A true Hairless often does not have as much furnishings (hair on the head, tail, and paws). The difference between a very hairy Hairless and a Powderpuff is that the Hairless has a single coat with hairless parts on the body, while the Powderpuff has a thick double coat. The skin of the Hairless comes in a variety of colors, ranging from a pale flesh to black. Hairless Cresteds often lack a full set of premolar teeth, but this is not considered a fault.

A Powderpuff has a long, soft coat. Both Hairless and Powderpuff varieties can appear in the same litter. The look of the Powderpuff varies according to how it is groomed. When its fur is completely grown out on its face, it strongly resembles a terrier; however, the Powderpuff is usually shaved around the snout as a standard cut.
The amount of body hair on the hairless variety varies quite extensively, from the true hairless which has very little or no body hair and furnishings, to what is called a ‘hairy hairless’, which if left ungroomed often grows a near-full coat of hair. These hairy hairless are not a mix between powderpuffs and hairless Chinese cresteds, but are merely a result of a weaker expression of the variable Hairless gene.

Neapolitan Mastiff

Neapolitan Mastiff

Neapolitan Mastiff

The Neapolitan Mastiff, Italian Mastiff is a large, ancient dog breed. This massive breed is often used as a guard and defender of family and property due to their protective instincts and their fearsome appearance.

According to American Kennel Club (AKC) standards, male Neapolitan Mastiffs should measure 26–31 inches (66–79 cm) at the withers, weigh 130–155 pounds (60-70 kg), while females should measure 24–29 inches (61–74 cm) and weigh 110–130 pounds (50–60 kg). Body length should be 10–15% greater than height.
Neopolitan Mastiffs, as a breed, are extremely intelligent dogs with a tendency to be independent thinkers.

They learn quickly, which is both good and bad, since this guardian breed needs extensive proper socialization to learn to accept strangers, especially within the home; without proper early socialization and training, these dogs are likely to become aggressive towards strangers and unfamiliar dogs.

Like with other breeds, forceful training methods, “alpha roles”, and a general “dominance” mentality will not work with these dogs, especially since it is difficult to try to physically dominate a dog that is nearly as large as an adult human; if one wants a well mannered dog, one should prevent problems before they happen by using positive training methods, beginning socializing early, and continuing socialization throughout life.

Neapolitans are not a very active breed as their energy tends to be short lived and their weight causes stress to their joints when excessive.

Bedlington Terrier

Bedlington Terrier

Bedlington Terrier

The Bedlington Terrier is a breed of terrier named after the mining town of Bedlington, Northumberland in North East England. The Bedlington Terrier is often described as having the look of a lamb with the heart of the lion, partly due to their linty-textured coat which is trimmed in a “lamb-like” cut. These dogs come in blue, liver and sandy coloration, all three of which can come with or without tan points.

The breed possesses the greying gene (located on the G locus) which is a dominant trait, causing the coat color to change from their birth colors of Black (in blues) or Dark Brown (in sandies and livers) to a silvery (for blues) or mauve (for livers and sandies) color on their bodies with a lighter colored topknot and legs.

This breed has a wedge-shaped head with piercing almond-shaped eyes. Its body shape is different from most terriers in terms of construction, resembling a sighthound more than a typical terrier, which enables these dogs to gallop at great speed.

However, the front assemblies of these dogs (shoulders, upper arms and front legs) are constructed differently from any other breed in that, the front legs are closer together at the feet than at the elbows – creating a triangular shape when viewed from the front. This enables them to turn or pivot quickly when chasing quarry at high speed, as well as get into the tight underground dens of their prey.

LowChen

LowChen

LowChen

The Löwchen is a breed of dog that once had the dubious distinction, like the Portuguese Water Dog and the Havanese, of being the rarest dog in the world. Even today, the breed generally has fewer than a few hundred new registrations each year worldwide.

The Lowchen is a breed with a long and wavy coat that is presented in a lion cut. This means that the haunches, back legs, front legs (except bracelets around the ankles), and the 1/3-1/2 of the tail closest to the body are shaved, and the rest of the coat is left natural to give the appearance of a lion-like form. A small dog, they are considered by some registries as a toy dog and by the AKC as a non-sporting dog. The breed is traceable to as far back as 1442.

They are found in many old paintings, drawings and literature. It is possible to trace the Lowchen history to the three countries of what are now known as Belgium, Germany and Holland. It is thought the breeds ancestor was a dog that was brought in by travelers from the far eastern lands of Tibet, that mingled with local dogs such as Spitz and terrier type dogs.

Occasionally an genetic throw-back is found. The head of the Löwchen is one of the most important features, with its relatively short, wide muzzle, broad skull, lively round eyes, and pendulant ears. The head, when in proportion to the body, is neither too big nor too small, but helps to emphasize the friendly, regal, and leonine personality of the Löwchen.

The coat should not be thin and fluffy like a Bichon Frise, but wavy with a mix of thicker hairs amongst the fine ones. This allows for a flowing coat that is not frizzy or fly-away, and a Löwchen coat should neither be soft like a nor harsh like many terriers. They can come in all colours, including brown, that allow for dark eyes and nose.

The Löwchen is a friendly, happy dog. Dogs of this breed are both active and playful, and very intelligent. The Löwchen makes a good pet for families with children and an excellent house pet.

Lagotto Romagnolo

Lagotto Romagnolo

Lagotto Romagnolo

The Lagotto Romagnolo is a breed of dog that comes from the Romagna sub-region of Italy. The name means “lake dog from Romagna,” coming from the Italian word lago, lake. Its traditional function is a gundog, specifically a water retriever. However, it is often used to hunt for truffles.

The Lagotto can have large round eyes in any shade color ranging from dark yellow to dark brown. The wooly coat is very thick and curly. Solid colors include off-white, white, or brown. They can also be found white with brown or orange patches or roan. It is a medium-sized dog that is hypoallergenic. A Lagotto often displays white markings that grow out in adulthood.

Bergamasco

The Bergamasco is a breed of dog with its origins in the Italian Alps near Bergamo, where it was originally used as a herding dog. The Bergamasco should be a medium size dog, well proportioned and harmonious having a rustic appearance. It is a solidly compact dog with a strong, powerful build that gives it great resistance without taking away any of its agility and speed of movement.

Bergamasco can compete in dog agility trials, obedience, showmanship, flyball, tracking, and herding events. Herding instincts and trainability can be measured at noncompetitive herding tests. Bergamasco exhibiting basic herding instincts can be trained to compete in herding trials.

Cambodian Razorback Dog

Cambodian Razorback Dog

Cambodian Razorback Dog

This dog may look normal at times but it is known for its rather large and unique razor down his back. These are actually tropical dogs but they have a long coat, which is not common for a dog that lives in these warm areas. But this dog does not seem to overheat and they can be found all over Cambodia. This is a very territorial dogs but they do not bark unless there is a real need for them. While they can be very friendly and loving dogs they are not for the first time dog owner.

Puli

Puli

Puli

The Puli is a medium-big breed of Hungarian herding and livestock guarding dog known for its long, corded coat. The tight curls of the coat, similar to dreadlocks, make it virtually waterproof. A similar looking, but much larger Hungarian dog breed is called Komondor.

The Puli is a solid colored dog that is usually black. Other less common coat colors are white, gray, or cream (off white or fakó in Hungarian). A variety of the cream-coated dogs have black masks. The white Pulis are often blue-eyed and called Roxies. The breed standard is for females about 16.5 inches (42 cm) at the withers, and 17 inches for males.

Females weigh 23-25 pounds, males slightly more. The coat of some Puli dogs can be different, thinner or thicker cords, either flat or round, depending on the texture of the coat and the balance of undercoat to outer coat. The coat is the result of a controlled matting process. Thin rope-like corded coats are desired and the grooming should control the coat towards the forming of thinner ropes.

The Puli’s coat needs considerable grooming to keep its cords clean, neat, and attractive. With age the coat can become quite long, even reaching the ground. Alternatively, the coat can be trimmed short regularly for easy maintenance, although the corded coat is what attracts many people to the breed. Contrary to some beliefs, the coat of a healthy puli will grow out again after trimming. This breed has little to no shedding .

Pulis are reasonably intelligent, agile dogs. Despite their bulky appearance and very thick coat they are very fast, agile and able to change directions instantly and are obedient enough to train for athletic competition. They are devoted and form close bonds with their owners.

The breed is intelligent and can do well in obedience training if begun early. Traditionally, the Puli dog breed was used both as a livestock guarding dog, and herding dog as well. They make very good guard dogs, as they are very protective of their master and territory. The Puli is sensitive, fun loving, courageous, but also at times tough and headstrong.

They are loyal to their owners and wary of strangers. They are highly active and keep a playful, puppy-like behavior their entire life. They need a lot of exercise and free space, preferably outdoors. They can be trained and housebroken, but Pulis are generally not very well suited to be city or indoor pets.

When restricted to closed spaces for long times, they grow restless and might develop unwanted personality traits, such as becoming hyperactive or, instead, increasingly aloof and lazy.

As a working dog, the Puli is very obedient, focused and determined when assigned a task. Some of them are used as police dogs. As a livestock guarding dog they are fiercely protective of their territory and flock, and, despite their relatively small size, will fearlessly try to scare and drive any intruder away, however they very rarely inflict any real injuries.

As a family dog, they make good security dogs and faithful family guardians. They can be very friendly and playful, even in old age. They regard their family as their flock, and will keep their distance until they are sure a stranger is not a threat. When annoyed, they may attack without warning, so a considerable distance may be advisable for strangers. They can be extremely independent and obstinate, and only accept strong willed individuals as master.

Xoloitzcuintli

Xoloitzcuintli

Xoloitzcuintli

The Xolo comes in three sizes, Toy, Miniature, Standard, and two varieties: The coated and the hairless. The Hairless being the more sought after and popular variety. It is very hairless with or with out a short tuffed of hair on the head and tail. The hairless Xolo should never be hairy, or possess long hair, wire hair or wavy hair. It’s skin should be soft and smooth, yet hardy to the elements. The Xolo comes in a variety of colors, from black to slate, gray, bronze, brindle, red, fawn, solid or spotted.

The coated variety should have a full coat of hair, short, sleek, clean, like that of a Doberman, and with regular brushing shed very little. The coated Xolo should also not possess long hair, wire, or wavy hair. It has a loyal following to those who love the breed but prefer a coat of hair on their dog. In an average litter of five.

Four will be hairless and one will be coated. This is a very robust and hardy breed, with a broad skull and black or skin colored nose. Almond shaped eyes are dark or in keeping with the color of the dog. It’s most noticeable character is it’s large upright bat like ears, it is very keen and can hear and alert you to danger or stranger. Xolo do change colors as they mature.

The Xolo is very intelligent, loyal, alert, athletic, and extremely loving to it’s family. It is important that all family members play a role in leadership, rearing, training, and feeding the Xolo, or it will bond to the one person or people who do. It is naturally protective and aloof to strangers. With proper socializing it is very good with company and children.

It is a myth that Xolo’s are vegetarian’s, however they do love veggies. This breed is easy to house train, and learns very quick. You must be the leader and teach the Xolo, or it will lead, and run the house for you.
This breed is becoming very popular as an obedience dog, therapy, agility, great pet, and conformation. Many swear they have learned more from their Xolo than any other breed, because they are so intelligent and in tune with their family. The Xolo is often called a velcro dog, staying with it’s owner at all times, it very seldom runs off or away. One owners testament claims she called and called for her Xolo only to look down and find it sitting right there looking up as if to say here I am.

So she learned quickly to simply look down first and there it will be. another owner claims her Xolo loves to climb trees with the kids and ride the horses with the owner. Xolo can escape anything, climb anything only to get to were you are. However since they are so smart they can also learn to stay were you want them as long as it is not forever.

Being a primitive breed with great survival skills, A Xolo will not tolerate abuse, or an unstable environment. With no shedding, no dander, and no fleas, the hairless variety is very popular with the clean, neat person, those with allergies and asthma, and with people who suffer from pain, arthritis type ailments. Being hairless, they radiate a warm, soothing, healing heat. This is only because they are hairless and not hotter.
This is not a yappy or hyper breed so do listen when your Xolo alerts you. Do not let the Xolo fall victim to Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behaviors where the dog believes he is pack leader to humans. This will cause varying degrees of behavior issues. Do not treat the dog like a human. Learn canine instincts and treat the dog accordingly, not forgetting the ever so important daily pack walk. You will be rewarded many times over with a stable, well balanced dog.

Affenpinscher

Affenpinscher

Affenpinscher

The Affenpinscher is a small dog with a shaggy, wiry-type coat. The hair on the face is longer than the rest of the body giving it a distinct look. It is a smaller version of a working terrier and is not a delicate dog. It has a square-body, with a moderately broad, deep chest. The head is round with a pronounced stop, which is the transition area from the backskull to the muzzle.

The lower jaw is undershot, and broad enough for the lower teeth to be straight and even, protruding below the dog’s short nose. The prominent, round eyes are black. The neck is short and arched and the limbs are straight and well boned. The tail is carried high and docked to two-thirds its length.

The hairy ears are customarily docked, pointed and erect, however some countries have banned docking of animal’s tails and ears. The coat is usually black or dark gray, but can also come in lighter gray, silver, red, or black and tan. The undercoat is slightly curly.

The Affenpinscher has a terrier-like personality. They tend to get along with other dogs and pets especially when they are raised with them. They are busy, bold, inquisitive and stubborn, but they also love to monkey around, being playful and mischievous. A lively sharp-witted, little dog that is courageous and confident. A fearless defender, the Affenpinscher will quickly become an authoritarian, if owners do not give the proper rules, boundaries, limitations and constantly be this dogs pack leader.

It is very affectionate and amusing. This friendly little dog enjoys being with its family. It needs consistent, firm training. Make sure there is some variety in the training so the dog does not become bored. They learn commands very quickly. Some may be difficult to housebreak.

They are not recommended for very young children, simply because most people who own the breed treat them like a small dog, lacking the proper pack leadership, causing negative behaviors to come out in the dog. Children should be taught how to properly handle a dog. Owners need to consistently be the dog’s pack leader to avoid the tenancy to guard their food and toys.

They like to hike and go camping. Without leadership, it may unwisely challenge large dogs and other large animals. They tend to bark and even climb. This little dog does best with a family who likes entertainment and has a very good sense of humor. Any dog who displays growling, snapping or biting, has a lacking in pack leadership. These issues can be corrected as soon as the humans take control back from the dog.

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