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Beautifully Dangerous: Poisonous Plants

Beautiful gardens with lovely plant species are very eye catching and this is like a hobby for many garden lovers. All the garden lovers want as many plants and flowers in their garden as they can. But attention people, some of the most commonly found garden plants are extremely poisonous and can be fatal if are touched or consumed in any way.

1) Oleander (Nerium Oleander) -

Nerium oleander is an evergreen shrub or small tree in the dogbane family Apocynaceae, toxic in all its parts. It is the only species currently classified in the genus Nerium. It is most commonly known as oleander, from its superficial resemblance to the unrelated olive Olea, but has many other names. It is so widely cultivated that no precise region of origin has been identified, though southwest Asia has been suggested. The ancient city of Volubilis in Morocco took its name from the old Latin name for the flower. Oleander is one of the most poisonous of commonly grown garden plants.

Oleander (Nerium Oleander)2)  Manchineel (Hippomane Mancinella) -

The Manchineel tree, Hippomane mancinella, is a species of flowering plant in the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), native to Florida in the United States, the Bahamas, the Caribbean, Central America, and northern South America.The name “manchineel” (sometimes written “manchioneel”) as well as the specific epithet mancinella is from Spanish manzanilla (“little apple”), from the superficial resemblance of its fruit and leaves to those of an apple tree. A present-day Spanish name is in fact manzanilla de la muerte, “little apple of death”. This refers to the fact that manchineel is one of the most poisonous trees in the world.

Manchineel (Hippomane Mancinella)3) Deadly Nightshade (Atropa Belladonna) -

Atropa belladonna or Atropa bella-donna, commonly known as Belladonna, Devil’s Berries, Death Cherries or Deadly Nightshade, is a perennial herbaceous plant in the family Solanaceae, native to Europe, North Africa, and Western Asia. The foliage and berries are extremely toxic, containing tropane alkaloids. These toxins include scopolamine and hyoscyamine which cause a bizarre delirium and hallucinations, and are also used as pharmaceutical anticholinergics. The drug atropine is derived from the plant.

4) Castor Beans -

The castor oil plant, Ricinus communis, is a species of flowering plant in the spurge family, Euphorbiaceae. Its seed is the castor bean which, despite its name, is not a true bean. Castor is indigenous to the southeastern Mediterranean Basin, Eastern Africa, and India, but is widespread throughout tropical regions. The seed contains ricin, a toxin, which is also present in lower concentrations throughout the plant.

Castor Beans5) Water Hemlock (Cicuta) -

Cicuta, commonly known as water hemlock, is a small genus of four species of highly poisonous plants in the family Apiaceae. They are perennial herbaceous plants which grow up to 2.5 meters (8.2 ft) tall, having distinctive small green or white flowers arranged in an umbrella shape (umbel). Plants in this genus may also be referred to as cowbane or poison parsnip. Cicuta is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, mainly North America and Europe, typically growing in wet meadows, along streambanks and other wet and marshy areas. These plants bear a close resemblance to other members in the family Apiaceae and may be confused with a number of other edible and poisonous plants. The common name hemlock may also be confused with poison hemlock.

Water Hemlock (Cicuta)6) English Yew (Taxus Baccata) -

Most parts of the tree are toxic, except the bright red aril surrounding the seed, enabling ingestion and dispersal by birds. The major toxin is the alkaloid taxane. The foliage remains toxic even when wilted or dried. Horses have the lowest tolerance, with a lethal dose of 200–400 mg/kg body weight, but cattle, pigs, and other livestock are only slightly less vulnerable. Symptoms include staggering gait, muscle tremors, convulsions, collapse, difficulty breathing, coldness and eventually heart failure. However, death occurs so rapidly that many times the symptoms are missed. Fatal poisoning in humans is very rare, only occurring after eating a lot of yew foliage. The lethal dose is reported to be between 50 and 100 grams. The wood is also poisonous. Some bow makers are reputed to have died from the frequent handling of the wood in their craft.

English Yew (Taxus Baccata)7) Rhubarb -

Rhubarb is a group of plants that belong to the genus Rheum in the family Polygonaceae. They are herbaceous perennial plants growing from short, thick rhizomes. They have large leaves that are somewhat triangular-shaped with long fleshy petioles. They have small flowers grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences. Although the leaves are toxic, various parts of the plants have medicinal and culinary uses. The traditional Chinese pharmacopeia features rhubarb (as a laxative).In culinary use, fresh raw stalks are crisp (similar to celery) with a strong tart taste; most commonly the plant’s stalks are cooked and used in pies and other foods for their tart flavour.

Rhubarb8) Daphne -

Daphne ( meaning “laurel”) is a genus of between 50 and 95 species of deciduous and evergreen shrubs in the family Thymelaeaceae, native to Asia, Europe, and north Africa. They are noted for their scented flowers and poisonous berries.

Daphne9) Dumb Cane (Dieffenbachia) -

Dieffenbachia  is a genus of tropical plants in the Family Araceae noted for their patterned leaves. Members of this genus are popular as houseplants because of their tolerance for shade. The common name is ‘dumb cane’ due to its poisoning effect on the throat due to raphides. The cells of the Dieffenbachia plant contain needle-shaped calcium oxalate crystals called raphides. If a leaf is chewed, these crystals can cause a temporary burning sensation and erythema. In rare cases, edema of tissues exposed to the plant have been reported. Mastication and ingestion generally result in only mild symptoms.

Dumb Cane (Dieffenbachia)10) Jimson Weed (Datura Stramonium) -

Datura stramonium, known by the common names jimson weed, devil’s trumpet, devil’s weed, thorn apple, tolguacha, Jamestown weed, stinkweed, locoweed, datura, pricklyburr, devil’s cucumber, Hell’s Bells, moonflower and, in South Africa, malpitte and mad seeds, is a common weed in the Solanaceae (nightshade) family. All parts of Datura plants contain dangerous levels of poison and may be fatal if ingested by humans or other animals, including livestock and pets. In some places it is prohibited to buy, sell or cultivate Datura plants. The active ingredients are the tropane alkaloids atropine, hyoscyamine and scopolamine which are classified as deliriants, or anticholinergics. Due to the elevated risk of overdose in uninformed users, many hospitalizations, and some deaths, are reported from recreational use.

Jimson Weed (Datura Stramonium)

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