Apr 17, 2014

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Coloured X-Rays of Flowers : Turning X-Ray Into An Art by Hugh Turvey

They say beauty is only skin deep – but Hugh Turvey’s x-rays of flowers show they are captivating through and through. Hugh, who trained as a designer / art director before studying photography Gered Mankowitz, first used X-rays in 1996 to photograph a human skull as a favour to a musician friend who needed an image for an album cover.

He has since used the technique to produce a series of coloured x-rays of everyday objects.

A row of hyacinths at various stages of development and flowering

Hugh, 39, has been fascinated since childhood with getting underneath the surface of things. He said: “I’m driven by my curiosity. It’s about discovering the world around us. As a kid I would take things apart to see what was inside and how they worked. I have an insane curiosity for how things work. X-ray gives me a way to get that insight and turn it into art”

A dozen roses

Arum lilies

Honesty seed pods

Anthurium

Elderflower

A coloured X-ray of a rose

A coloured X-ray of a lily

Thistles

A close-up of an X-ray of a thistle flower

Stargazer lilies

An orchid (Stanhopea hasselvoliana)

Seaweed

Tulips

A rose

Nigella damascena (Love-in-a-mist) seed capsules

Agapanthus

Lisianthus flowers

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16 Responses to Coloured X-Rays of Flowers : Turning X-Ray Into An Art by Hugh Turvey

  1. Michel De Moor says:

    Tout simplement beau.
    Comme quoi, avec l’imagination et quelques talents artisiques on peut sublimer des choses banales de la vie de tous les jours.

  2. PAULA says:

    WONDERFUL PIECES!!!

  3. Jackie Aldridge says:

    Just Beautiful!

  4. how about doing a venus flytrap? (complete with fly)

  5. Tony Walsh says:

    Absolutely beautiful. As a photographer and a teacher with a specific interest in flora I find these images captivating. I’d love to discuss, possibly use in a project.
    Regards
    Tony Walsh

  6. Fiona Hastings says:

    Really beautiful – they make the ‘every day’ seem etheral. Maybe this is something we all need to consider in our ‘every day’ lives….??

    Enjoy!

    Fiona

  7. Richard Baldwin says:

    The detail is just amazing, almost a scientific insight into everyday flora – but in a beautiful artistic way… the technique is brilliant and would love to know what other medium has been imaged in the past too?

    All the best
    Richard

  8. Mike Andrews says:

    These are really amazing. Like the guy above me said, the detail and clarity is amazing. Fantastic!

  9. Bunny says:

    These are so amazingly beautiful!! Did you show some of your work at Tower Hill Botanicals in Boylston, MA? I have seen something like this there and was just thrilled with that too!

  10. sara says:

    Very creative and a delight to the senses.

  11. moni says:

    Fantastic shots, great idea: the tulips are the best!
    Greetings from Germany – moni

  12. Sterling says:

    Might try feeding the plants a special diet high in iron, etc. Would highlight the veins. Possibly sprinkle a fine metal dust on the plants as well.

    Other possible subjects: tree leaves, celery, watermellon, a bee, bettle, butterfly, or worm on the flower, pees (flowers and pods), peanuts grown in loamy soil (for better x-ray penatration. If that works… an ant farm. Getting a little far a field). Advacoto (sp?), artichoke, etc.

  13. Simply wonderful – you really should publish these in a book – it would be a fantastic gift.

  14. Laure Tobert says:

    great share what looking for something like that since so long !

  15. aswin says:

    Wow That was excellent.Great idea…

  16. tie shop says:

    Other possible subjects: tree leaves, celery, watermellon, a bee, bettle, butterfly, or worm on the flower, pees (flowers and pods), peanuts grown in loamy soil (for better x-ray penatration. If that works… an ant farm. Getting a little far a field). Advacoto (sp?), artichoke, etc.

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