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Coloured X-Rays of Flowers : Turning X-Ray Into An Art by Hugh Turvey

They say beauty is only skin deep – but Hugh Turvey’s x-rays of flowers show they are captivating through and through. Hugh, who trained as a designer / art director before studying photography Gered Mankowitz, first used X-rays in 1996 to photograph a human skull as a favour to a musician friend who needed an image for an album cover.

He has since used the technique to produce a series of coloured x-rays of everyday objects.

A row of hyacinths at various stages of development and flowering

Hugh, 39, has been fascinated since childhood with getting underneath the surface of things. He said: “I’m driven by my curiosity. It’s about discovering the world around us. As a kid I would take things apart to see what was inside and how they worked. I have an insane curiosity for how things work. X-ray gives me a way to get that insight and turn it into art”

A dozen roses

Arum lilies

Honesty seed pods

Anthurium

Elderflower

A coloured X-ray of a rose

A coloured X-ray of a lily

Thistles

A close-up of an X-ray of a thistle flower

Stargazer lilies

An orchid (Stanhopea hasselvoliana)

Seaweed

Tulips

A rose

Nigella damascena (Love-in-a-mist) seed capsules

Agapanthus

Lisianthus flowers

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16 Responses to Coloured X-Rays of Flowers : Turning X-Ray Into An Art by Hugh Turvey

  1. Tout simplement beau.
    Comme quoi, avec l’imagination et quelques talents artisiques on peut sublimer des choses banales de la vie de tous les jours.

  2. Absolutely beautiful. As a photographer and a teacher with a specific interest in flora I find these images captivating. I’d love to discuss, possibly use in a project.
    Regards
    Tony Walsh

  3. Really beautiful – they make the ‘every day’ seem etheral. Maybe this is something we all need to consider in our ‘every day’ lives….??

    Enjoy!

    Fiona

  4. The detail is just amazing, almost a scientific insight into everyday flora – but in a beautiful artistic way… the technique is brilliant and would love to know what other medium has been imaged in the past too?

    All the best
    Richard

  5. These are so amazingly beautiful!! Did you show some of your work at Tower Hill Botanicals in Boylston, MA? I have seen something like this there and was just thrilled with that too!

  6. Might try feeding the plants a special diet high in iron, etc. Would highlight the veins. Possibly sprinkle a fine metal dust on the plants as well.

    Other possible subjects: tree leaves, celery, watermellon, a bee, bettle, butterfly, or worm on the flower, pees (flowers and pods), peanuts grown in loamy soil (for better x-ray penatration. If that works… an ant farm. Getting a little far a field). Advacoto (sp?), artichoke, etc.

  7. Other possible subjects: tree leaves, celery, watermellon, a bee, bettle, butterfly, or worm on the flower, pees (flowers and pods), peanuts grown in loamy soil (for better x-ray penatration. If that works… an ant farm. Getting a little far a field). Advacoto (sp?), artichoke, etc.

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