Most Dangerous and Poisonous Creatures on this Earth

Do you think you are very brave and nothing on this earth can scare you? Then you must see pictures of these very scary creatures and I am sure you will get them in your dreams as nightmare. These creatures are very rare to see but once they are seen and you get to do a fight with them you will wish not to see them in future again.These creatures are very poisonous and very they come to show their capacity and power they are very aggressive too. Jelly fish, stone fish. Spiders and snakes come into this category. But all of them are not very harmful. But some of them which are mentioned below really are.

A person attacked by these creatures survives only for few hours and sometimes not even for that time. Almost all these creatures are found in Sydney. So u can call Sydney a hell based on this fact. Just scroll down to have a look and get ready to face the fear.

Sydney Funnel Web Spider

Sydney Funnel Web Spider
Sydney Funnel Web Spider

Sydney funnel-webs are medium to large in size, with body length ranging from 1 to 5 cm (0.39 to 2.0 in). They are glossy and darkly colored, ranging from blue-black, to black, to brown or dark-plum colored. The carapace covering the cephalothorax is almost hairless and appears smooth and glossy.

Another characteristic are finger-like spinnerets at the end of their abdomen. The shorter-lived males are smaller than females but longer legged.

Atrax Robustus is one of three species of the genus Atrax in the family Hexathelidae, the other two being Atrax sutherlandi and Atrax yorkmainorum.[4] The Sydney funnel-web spider shares its name with some members of the genus Hadronyche. However, it remains, together with the northern tree funnel-web, the only Australian funnel-web spider known to have inflicted fatal bites to humans.

The Sydney funnel-web spider (Atrax robustus) is an Australian funnel-web spider usually found within a 100 km (62 mi) radius of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Black mamba

Black mamba
Black mamba

The black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis), also called the common black mamba or black-mouthed mamba, is the longest venomous snake in Africa, averaging around 2.5 to 3.2 meters (8.2 to 10 ft) in length, and sometimes growing to lengths of 4.45 meters (14.6 ft).

It is named for the black coloration inside the mouth rather than the colour of its scales which varies from dull yellowish-green to a gun-metal grey. It is the fastest snake in the world, capable of moving at 4.32 to 5.4 metres per second (16–20 km/h, 10–12 mph). It has a reputation for being aggressive and highly venomous and is among the world’s most venomous land snakes.

Solifugae

Solifugae
Solifugae

Solifugae are an order of animals belonging to Arachnida, known as camel spiders, wind scorpions and sun spiders or solifuges, comprising more than 1,000 described species in about 153 genera. Solifugae are not true spiders (which are from a different order, Araneae).

Like scorpions and harvestmen, they belong to a distinct arachnid order. They may grow to a length of 300 mm (12 in) including legs, and have a body comprising an opisthosoma (abdomen) and a prosoma (head) with conspicuously large chelicerae, which are also used for stridulation. Most species live in deserts and feed opportunistically on ground-dwelling arthropods and other animals. A number of urban legends exaggerate the size and speed of Solifugae, and their potential danger to humans.

Stonefish stings in Australia

Stonefish stings in Australia
Stonefish stings in Australia

Stonefish stings in Australia can cause poisoning and death if not treated. The stonefish is the most venomous fish in the world. The stonefish has venom in its dorsal spines; when stepped on by a human, the venom is forced into the foot. Most stonefish stings occur when stepped on.

It is less common for the fish to sting when it is picked up. Stonefish stings can occur on the beach, not just in the water, with stonefish being able to stay out of the water for up to 24 hours. They often cannot be seen easily as they look similar to rocks or coral. Stonefish antivenom is the second-most administered in Australia.

Aborigines knew of the venom of the stonefish and had corroborees which involve re-enacting death from someone who trod on the fish. The Aborigines of Northern Australia and the Great Barrier Reef had different ways of preparing the fish for eating to avoid poisoning.

After stonefish poisoning, the amount of anti-venom given depends on the number of puncture wounds from the stonefish spines.

Lion’s Mane Jellyfish

Lion’s Mane Jellyfish
Lion’s Mane Jellyfish

The lion’s mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata) is the largest known species of jellyfish. Its range is confined to cold, boreal waters of the Arctic, northern Atlantic, and northern Pacific Oceans, seldom found farther south than 42°N latitude.

Similar jellyfish, which may be the same species, are known to inhabit seas near Australia and New Zealand. The largest recorded specimen found, washed up on the shore of Massachusetts Bay in 1870, had a bell (body) with a diameter of 7 feet 6 inches (2.29 m) and tentacles 120 feet (37 m) long.